Attorney combating gender based violence by day...
by night: living, loving, laughing over good food & drink with friends in NYC & DC

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from Vanity Fair with 115 notes

vanityfair:

In the Details | David Chang 
A panoply of eccentric biographical data RE: chefdom’s fretful ramen master.
HE IS the Virginia-raised son of Korean immigrants—educated in Vienna, a suburb of Washington, D.C., but well acquainted with Richmond, where his father had a business. Culinarily, this background has come to bear on such Chang creations as his Honeycrisp-apple kimchi with jowl bacon and Noodle Bar’s fried chicken served two ways, southern-style and Korean-style.
HIS FAVORITE extra-vocational activity is fly-fishing, which satisfies him, paradoxically, “because it’s constant dissatisfaction.”
HE HAS spent much of his life deliberately evading anything that smacks of normalcy. Of late, however, he finds himself thinking, “Man, normal might be really nice right now.”
Read more here. 
Photograph by Gasper Tringale. 

vanityfair:

In the Details | David Chang 

A panoply of eccentric biographical data RE: chefdom’s fretful ramen master.

HE IS the Virginia-raised son of Korean immigrants—educated in Vienna, a suburb of Washington, D.C., but well acquainted with Richmond, where his father had a business. Culinarily, this background has come to bear on such Chang creations as his Honeycrisp-apple kimchi with jowl bacon and Noodle Bar’s fried chicken served two ways, southern-style and Korean-style.

HIS FAVORITE extra-vocational activity is fly-fishing, which satisfies him, paradoxically, “because it’s constant dissatisfaction.”

HE HAS spent much of his life deliberately evading anything that smacks of normalcy. Of late, however, he finds himself thinking, “Man, normal might be really nice right now.”

Read more here. 

Photograph by Gasper Tringale. 

21st April 2014

Photo reblogged from The Atlantic with 2,338 notes

newsweek:

A Map of all the Places in the U.S. Where Nobody Lives - Jenny Xie - The Atlantic Cities

newsweek:

A Map of all the Places in the U.S. Where Nobody Lives - Jenny Xie - The Atlantic Cities

Source: theatlanticcities.com

20th April 2014

Photo reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 75,928 notes

themarysue:

flat-adverb:

lucillebruise:

stunningpicture:

Portrait I drew of the lovely Maggie Smith.

I am getting this framed and hung over my fireplace goddamn.

Same.

themarysue:

flat-adverb:

lucillebruise:

stunningpicture:

Portrait I drew of the lovely Maggie Smith.

I am getting this framed and hung over my fireplace goddamn.

Same.

Source: stunningpicture

20th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 3,031 notes

archiemcphee:

California-based Yarnboming artists Jill and Lorna Watt of Knits For Life (previously featured here) recently transformed a pair of unassuming benches near the San Francisco Ferry Building into adorably ferocious monsters, complete with six awesome orange feet. The irrepressibly inventive sisters created this delightful yarn installation for an upcoming episode of CCTV America’s new show Full Frame.

[via Laughing Squid]

Source: archiemcphee

20th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Talebearing with 2,736 notes

johnskylar:

sethshead:

johnskylar:

rosalarian:

When I say people want to see more diversity in stories, no, I really don’t mean different stories about straight white dudes. I really, really don’t mean that at all. This isn’t about types of stories being told. This is specifically about people. I’m not letting you make this about something else. You are not hijacking this message to make sure we’re still talking about straight white dudes.

I don’t just do it for business reasons, but yes, this is a strong reason that I write people of all types and backgrounds as my viewpoint characters.

Also because it makes me a better person.  Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes—and not just writing them as a thinly veiled version of you—can go a long way towards helping you understand them.

But if diversity of people is your end-in-itself, as characters and writers, then you still risk a diversity of crappy stories. Further, it isn’t hard to have a diversity of faces without a diversity of ideas and perspectives. Case in point: Republican Party.

Meanwhile, if the goal is interesting, diverse ideas and stories, then the inevitable byproduct of that is a real diversity of people. Sometimes the best route to what you want isn’t direct, but oblique.

That point boils down to “But if your fiction is still bad, it’ll be bad.”  Yes, I agree—however I think that’s somewhat obvious.

"Writing diversity" doesn’t mean writing white people with shaded faces.  That’s not writing diversity.  That’s writing blackface, or writing whitewashing, depending on how bad/racist you are at it.

"Writing diversity" means writing real people who are different from each other due to culture, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, race, and any number of factors.  It means pulling out the stops on the definition of "normal."  You don’t have to be oblique about that.  You can do it head on.  There’s zero reason not to.

You don’t make a plot less interesting by adapting it to feature characters of diverse backgrounds.  It’s through that kind of adaptation that we make the same basic story structures, which have existed for a long time, continue to spring to life on the printed page.

Source: rosalarian

19th April 2014

Photo reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 4,336 notes

theliberaltony:



Experts have repeatedly debunked the myth that transgender non-discrimination laws give sexual predators access to women’s restrooms, but that hasn’t stopped conservative media outlets from promoting fake news stories to fear monger about trans-inclusive bathrooms.
For as long as the transgender community has fought for protection from discrimination in public spaces, conservatives have peddled the myth that sexual predators will exploit non-discrimination laws to sneak into women’s restrooms.
That fear has been an extremely effective tool for scaring people into voting against even basic protections for transgender people, which is why conservatives routinely use the phrase “bathroom bill" to describe laws prohibiting discrimination in public accommodations. When conservative media outlets attack non-discrimination laws for transgender people, they almost exclusively focus on bathroom and locker room facilities.
But that fear is baseless - completely unsupported by years of evidence from states that already have non-discrimination laws on the books. In a new 
Media Matters report, experts from twelve states - including law enforcement officials, state human rights workers, and sexual assault victims advocates - debunk the myth that non-discrimination laws have any relation to incidents of sexual assault or harassment in public restrooms

Read More

theliberaltony:

Experts have repeatedly debunked the myth that transgender non-discrimination laws give sexual predators access to women’s restrooms, but that hasn’t stopped conservative media outlets from promoting fake news stories to fear monger about trans-inclusive bathrooms.

For as long as the transgender community has fought for protection from discrimination in public spaces, conservatives have peddled the myth that sexual predators will exploit non-discrimination laws to sneak into women’s restrooms.

That fear has been an extremely effective tool for scaring people into voting against even basic protections for transgender people, which is why conservatives routinely use the phrase “bathroom bill" to describe laws prohibiting discrimination in public accommodations. When conservative media outlets attack non-discrimination laws for transgender people, they almost exclusively focus on bathroom and locker room facilities.

But that fear is baseless - completely unsupported by years of evidence from states that already have non-discrimination laws on the books. In a new 
Media Matters report, experts from twelve states - including law enforcement officials, state human rights workers, and sexual assault victims advocates - debunk the myth that non-discrimination laws have any relation to incidents of sexual assault or harassment in public restrooms
Read More

Source: mediamatters.org

19th April 2014

Link reblogged from MSNBC - Lean Forward with 27 notes

GOP consultants: Christie's 2016 prospects are on 'life support' →

19th April 2014

Quote reblogged from with 8,487 notes

Too many young women I think are harder on themselves than circumstances warrant. They are too often selling themselves short. They too often take criticism personally instead of seriously. You should take criticism seriously because you might learn something, but you can’t let it crush you. You have to be resilient enough to keep moving forward, whatever the personal setbacks and even insults that come your way might be. That takes a sense of humor about yourself and others. Believe me, this is hard-won advice I’m putting forth. It’s not like you wake up and understand this. It’s a process.

Source: New York Magazine

19th April 2014

Quote reblogged from with 516 notes

What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.
— Gabriel García Márquez (via strandbooks)

19th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Women in science with 13,281 notes

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

Source: magnius159